The Pillars, the Sea, and the Oxen (1 Kings 7:15 – 26; 2 Chronicles 4:1 – 5)

Hiram began to craft numerous items for the temple.  He began by casting two pillars, each 27 feet high, and 18 feet around.  Two capitals, 7 and 1/2 feet tall, stood on top of the pillars.  They were in the shape of lilies, and there were pomegranates all around.  There was a network of lattices, and wreaths of chainwork.  He set up the pillars by the vestibule of the temple.  They were named Jachin and Boaz.  Then they were finished.

The Sea was made of cast bronze, fifteen cubits across and perfectly round.  It was 7 and 1/2 feet tall, and 45 feet around.  It had ornamental buds around the brim and just below it.  They were cast in two rows.  The sea stood on twelve oxen. three each looking in the directions of the compass.  Their back parts pointed inward.  It held nearly 12,000 gallons of water.

Hiram’s craftsmanship was spectacular.  The pillars were a powerful entrance to the temple of the Lord.  They put the worshipper in the mind of an awesome God when they entered His temple.  The Sea represented the need for cleansing.  It was the place where people could wash their hands and their sacrifices before offering to God.  It is a type of the cleansing in which we should participate before entering into worship of a holy, mighty God.  The Sea was the place where anyone, rich or poor, young or old, could come for cleansing in preparation for worship.  We should seek God for forgiveness before we offer Him our talents, gifts, and service.  Then our offerings will be pleasing in His sight.

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